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Looking for some Finnish recipes / Etsin suomalaisia ​​reseptejä
  • I like rössypottu myself - a specialty of the Oulu region where I live. But since you're a vegetarian, the blood pudding (veripalttu) might not be up your alley.

    https://www.k-ruoka.fi/reseptit/rossypottu

  • Firefox added ad tracking and has already turned it on without asking you
  • This almost sounds like a hoax. But assuming it's true... Install LibreWolf. It's Firefox without the infuriating Mozilla stupid.

  • NewPipe outage over: version 0.27.1 restores YouTube playback
  • The NewPipe team deserve a Nobel Prize. It might look like an unimportant video player, but it's one of the last bastion of resistance against he Google monopoly and monoculture, the total invasion of advertisement in every corner of our lives, the privacy violation that always come with Google, and the general enshittification of the internet.

    Thank goodness for NewPipe...

  • [Discussion] What is your price range when you get a new phone?
  • Price is not the only factor for me: deGoogled is priority number one, and repairability is not far behind.

    With that in mind, I'd pay a lot of money for a rather average phone because that's exactly what I got: yesterday's phone at today's price. But I got what I wanted and I'm happy with it. So the price was right.

  • Signal under fire for storing encryption keys in plaintext on desktop app
  • Whatever its stores and however it stores it doesn't matter to me: I moved its storage space to my ~/.Private encrypted directory. Same thing for my browser: I don't use a master password or rely on its encryption because I set it up so it too saves my profile in the ~/.Private directory.

    See here for more information. You can essentially secure any data saved by any app with eCryptfs - at least when you're logged out.

    Linux-only of course. In Windows... well, Windows.

  • Google Contacts is getting a new 'Use without an account' option
  • Now you can let Google plunder your contacts without an account. That's progress!

  • How i can stop this google nag banner to login in third party websites?
  • Set your language to English: you'll get the nag in English.

    🥁🪘🥁

    Sorry...

    Seriously though, install Ublock Origin and block as many Google domains as possible. In Reddit, to get rid of that particular nag, block accounts.google.com and google.com.

    Alternatively, don't do Reddit.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • Of course I do. That job is the best gig I've ever had and it's one of the best things I have going on in my life. That's why I'm particularly cautious in this thread and I don't say anything that could put my employer of my employment in jeopardy in any way, even though it's highly unlikely.

  • Tool preventing AI mimicry cracked; artists wonder what’s next
  • however little they're paid, they'll always be orders of magnitude more expensive than a machine. And the machine doesn't complain, doesn't rest, doesn't get sick, doesn't organize walkouts and produces results immediately.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • I posted what I could legally post on my Github, and I made sure it's easily discoverable. If you need it, you'll find it very quickly.

    I have no reason to keep it for myself or my employer, since it's GPL. Also, I kind of like the idea of distributing what the unhelpful company I got it from only gives upon request: when they do that, they comply with the GPL, but in the most unhelpful way possible. With what I posted, nobody has to request that stuff ever again, and I cleaned up and updated their code too.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • It is neither. But here's a hint: it's orange and it runs a port of DAP Link.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • They already know. I've posted all the good I think of their device, as well as the author of the open-source debugging app that runs on it (it's actually a generic device), on their official Reddit sub. But it's just a general comment, not tied to this account of my little GPL adventure.

  • Tool preventing AI mimicry cracked; artists wonder what’s next
  • The artists - or any other workers impacted by AI - will not be able to resist the tidal wave of shittiness, for one simple reason: the corporate world wants AI very badly, precisely to get rid of expensive artists and workers. It doesn't matter to them whether AI is good or bad provided it lets them replace their expensive human workforce.

    Unfortunately, in today's dystopian capitalist world, when companies want something, everybody must bow to their wishes and there's nothing anybody can do to stop them. It's sad but it's the truth.

  • Company brought to its knees by a cable
  • Actually this happened in the lab. I know exactly who did this because he told me: we were discussing what had happened and he said "Oh yeah, Daniel and I needed to connect this Windows machine to the intranet quick because we had something urgent to do, and we connected all the ends of the nest of ethernet cables at random until the machine connected. And then we left everything as it was." But bad luck for us, their machine was connected, but so was that fatal cable on both ends. It just happened that their machine kept working well enough for them to finish what they were doing without noticing the problems rightaway.

    And in case you wonder, there's no penalty in our company for owning up to honest mistakes, so that's why he readily admitted to it. Only people who never do anything never do anything wrong.

  • Company brought to its knees by a cable
  • Yeah I keep calling them hubs incorrectly...

  • Company brought to its knees by a cable

    Yesterday around noon, the internet at my company started acting up. No matter, slowdowns happen and there's roadwork going on outside: maybe they hit the fiber or something. So we waited.

    Then our Samba servers started getting flaky. And the database too. Uh oh... That's different.

    We started investigating. Some machines were dropping ICMP packets like crazy, then recovered, then other machines started to become unpingable too. I fired up Wireshark and discovered an absolute flood of IGMP packets on all the trunks, mostly broadcast from Windows machine. It was so bad two Linux machines on the same switch couldn't ping each other reliably if the switch was connected to the intranet.

    So we suspected a DDOS attack initiated from within the intranet by an outside attacker. We cut off the internet, but the storm of packets kept on coming. Physically disconnecting machines from the intranet one by one didn't do a thing either.

    Eventually, we started disconnecting each trunk one by one from the main router until we disconnected one and all the activity lights immediately stopped on all the ports. We reconnected it and the crazy traffic resumed.

    So we went to that trunk's subrouter and did the same thing. When we found the cable that stopped all the traffic, we followed it and finally found one lonely $10 ethernet switch with... a cable with both ends plugged into the switch. We disconnected the cable and everything instantly returned to normal.

    One measly cable brought the entire company to a standstill for hours! Because half of the software we have to use are cloud crap or need to call their particular motherships to activate their licenses, many people couldn't work anymore for no good technical reason at all while we investigated the networking issue.

    Anyway, I thought switches had protections against that sort of loopback connection, and routers prevented circular routes. But there's theory and there's reality. Crazy!

    35
    GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • Well possibly, but here's the thing: if I don't say anything, I don't have to worry about having to explain myself later.

    This is just a software project, I really really like my job and I have other hills to die on frankly. So I just don't need the aggravation.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • The particular open-source license doesn't matter: they're doing all they can to not release their source code and that's what I need to fix their stuff.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • I can't sadly. It would make it obvious which company I'm talking about, and if ever read this thread, they could retaliate against us.

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news
  • My employer is openly willing to let the engineers work on whatever they want, however long it takes to make things good or better, not just good enough. The bean counters don't run this place: we take the time to do things right.

    It's a policy that has worked for us for the past 40 years, and it's the main reason why our customers come back to us and we've been consistently very successful over the decades.

    Anyhow, originally one of my colleagues asked me if it would be possible to compile and debug our code in VSCode instead of the company's IDE. I said I'd try to see if it's possible, and then I went down the rabbit hole - with my boss' blessing 🙂

  • GPL violation follow-up - some bad news and some good news

    You might recall a few weeks ago that I requested from a well-known large and somewhat litigious company the source code of the modification they made to a certain GPL debugger, and that they grudgingly agreed after a long time.

    So I set out to work on the pile of code they sent me and managed to extract their modifications and port them fo the latest version of that GPL tool... apart from one driver for their debug probes that we use throughout our company: the cunning bastards left a stub in the open-source debugger (I have the code for that) and that stubs talks to the rest of the driver in the form of a closed-source TCP server.

    It's a blatant trick to go around the GPL by taking advantage of the grey area surrounding linking in the GPL - i.e. the question of whether a closed-source program can be linked to GPL code and not become GPL itself, which still hasn't been tested in court to my knowledge. If I recall correctly, the FSF is of the opinion that anything that dynamically links to GPL code becomes GPL too, but that's just an opinion.

    And of course, here in this case, the aforementioned company added one degree of separation between their closed-source driver and the GPL tool that uses it by making it a server, so whatever argument against linking to GPL code becomes even weaker.

    Anyway, as you can imagine, I'm disappointed: my work is 90% there, but I still don't have that one driver and their closed-source faux-server is half-broken and dog-slow because of the time it takes to spawn the server and communicate with it through TCP, and I can't fix it. And I'm 100% certain that if I asked them to send me the source code for that, they'd tell me to suck eggs.

    But here's what happened: I got so tired of their shenanigans that I started investigating other debug probes I could use instead of their proprietary junk. And after quite a lot of investigation, I found one solution based on open hardware and open software that, with some careful configuration, works 2x to 3x faster than their proprietary debug probe. Wow! I didn't even know it was possible, and I probably wouldn't have researched it if I had had all I needed to make what we already own works.

    Long story short: I proposed that my company replace all our existing proprietary debug probes with the open hardware one and my boss agreed. That's like 20 probes in total, between R&D, testing and production, and at the tune $266.99 per probe for the original proprietary one, that's $5339.80 the egregious GPL-violating company won't get from us. Not to mention renewal of the license for their IDE that we've been using for almost 2 decades, because finally, at long last, after over a month of solid work, I finally managed to free up our source code from their vendor lock-in and make it compile, debug and flash using open-source tools from start to finish!

    So yeah, I didn't get what I originally wanted from that company. That's the bad news. But in the end I ended up better off without it, and that's the good news 🙂

    45
    Has Techlore sold out?

    I like Techlore (https://www.techlore.tech if you don't know) and I usually regard them as one of the most impartial and most trustworthy Youtubers out there. But for the past few months, I couldn't help noticing their somewhat heavy bias towards some of their video sponsors. Still, everybody has to eat right?

    This time though, it looks like Synology flew them over to Taiwan, and if you watch their video at the event, it's wall-to-wall Synology shilling. I'm really disappointed.

    50
    My quest to find a simple, unobtrusive autocompletion solution is finally successful

    So I'm very happy with vim, and have been for the past quarter century (I used Elvis before that. Remember Elvis? It was awesome! - But I digress...)

    I have to admit though, while I pity the fools in my company who use VSCode and mock me for using vim in the terminal, yet in fact produce code much slower than I do, I envy their IDE that suggests function and variable names in other project files.

    So I've been looking for a nice, easy-to-install solution to get some of that goodness in vim. Nothing fancy, just autocomplete suggestions to avoid having to grep names I forgot or having to yank/put text manually to prevent typos. And mostly easy, because for some reason, I'm properly allergic to any sort of vi configuration - be it vim or any other vi flavor.

    So I gave Neovim a shot. My plan was to ensure Neovim was at least as good as Vim, then try to install Treesitter. But that plan immediately went south, then kept on being a proper pain in the ass until I finally realized this was going nowhere fast and I didn't want to spend countless hours configuring that awful thing, so I gave up. I wasn't asking for much but Neovim totally failed to deliver.

    And then I found the solution I was looking for all along: YouCompleteMe. It's as simple as installing the handy vim-youcompleteme .deb for my distro (Linux Mint), running vam to install it and voila: a working autocompleter that actually works in 3 minutes flat and doesn't get in my way.

    0
    Beware of mosquitoes

    A mosquito bit me smack on a stump, right in the middle of a scar, and the entire scar flared up overnight over half its length like I had a chemical burn or something. It happened last week and it's still red and inflamed.

    This scar has been well healed 6 years ago and is normally invisible. The doc says wait and see, but it's mildly disturbing considering it was a single mosquito 7 days ago.

    So beware y'all: your skin might look nice and healthy on your tender bits, but evidently it can still be weak and vulnerable.

    2
    How to disable automatic identation

    I'm normally a straight vim user (just out of habit, no particular preference) and I'm giving neovim a spin. So far I like it but...

    For the love of all that's holy, how do I disable automatic indentation?

    I have noautoindent set, nosmartindent set, filetype indent off, but neovim keeps inserting indentations. The only thing that works is setting paste on, but that's not the right solution to this problem.

    Please help. This is driving me nuts!

    14
    What's the most suitable small EV to disable all internet connectivity?

    I have a very old diesel that I maintain religiously to make it last as long as possible, and whenever possible, I ride the bus. It's not that I wouldn't like a new car - and particularly an EV, those cars are attractive for a lot of reasons - but they all spy on their users nowadays and that's a big no-no for me. For that reason and that reason alone, I've refrained from buying a new car for years.

    But now I have a good reason to buy an EV: my employer has installed solar panels on the company's roof, is in the process of installing charge points on the parking lot, and is offering all the employees free charging.

    So I'm on the market for a small electric econobox to commute roughly 30 miles per day. I don't want anything fancy: just an honest-to-goodness little car with a steering wheel, an accelerator, a brake pedal and doors that lock. That's it. I don't care about creature comfort, I don't care about radio, GPS or anything else. I just want a car. And of course, of upmost importance to me, I want a car without telemetry, that doesn't spy on me and doesn't report to the mothership.

    So far I think the best option is to buy one of the first gen EVs with a 2G or 3G connection that plain doesn't work anymore, and have it overhauled. The problem is, I might want to buy a more recent, possibly more efficient vehicle. Also, good luck finding someone competent to service a battery pack in my area.

    If I went for a newer vehicle, what would be the best make/model to disable the internet immediately after purchase without any side effect? I've read that some models report a fault until the internet connectivity is restored, so those would be out of the question. And of course, if the antennae / SIM / 4G PCB or whatever needs to be disabled are super-hard to find, it wouldn't be ideal either.

    Any way to convert a modern car into an honest vehicle, or should I keep riding the bus and give the opportunity offered by my employer a pass?

    22
    What to do when a giant company refuses to honor a GPL claim?

    So this very large company who shall remain nameless distributes a proprietary software development environment that includes a patched version of a certain, well-known open-source debugging tool.

    The patch is to make said open-source tool support their products. It's not even hidden or anything: the binary is sitting right there in the installation directory, it's called the exact same thing the vanilla debugger is called and when I run it on the command line, it clearly says "patched for xyz".

    The tool in question is distributed under the GPLv2 and I need to modify it for my own project. So I sent an email to the company to request the source code for their modification, but they refuse by playing dumb and pretending they don't understand the question. They keep telling me the source code to their IDE is not public. I keep telling them I don't want their IDE but the source for the modified GPL backend tool they bundle with it. But no: they claim it's part of their product and they won't release it.

    Anybody knows the best course of action to deal with this? It's the first company I've dealt with that explicitly refuses to honor the GPL. I don't even think it's malice: I'm fairly sure the L2 support guy handling my ticket was told to deny my request by his clueless supervisor who didn't bother escalating it. But it's also a huge company that's known to be aggressive and litigious, whereas I'm just one guy and I'm not lawyering up over this. I have other hills to die on.

    Who should I pass the potato to? The FSF?

    41
    I spotted this at Prisma: the perfect metaphor for Finland

    It's attractive, it looks friendly, it's genuinely good, yet for no good reason, it tries to convince you it's not really that great 🙂

    0
    Euro bottles are so much better now
    toobnix.org Tethered caps suck

    I know they're supposed to be good for the environment but... God I hate those caps.

    Tethered caps suck

    I know they're supposed to be good for the environment but... God I hate those caps.

    168
    Astounding absurdity

    None of what follows is new. I know this stuff happens all the time. And yet somehow this insignificant thing shocked me and it's been gnawing at me for the past few days. And today was the icing on the shit cake.

    So my wife ordered a a foot massage machine. $50, typical el-cheapo thing made in China. The thing was shipped to our home out in the boonies in less than 48 hours. Wow!

    My wife opened the box, got the device out onto the floor and... she couldn't fit her feet inside. She's not big, but apparently the device was designed for customers in the Shire. Unusable.

    So she emailed the distributor who told her to cut the cord, send them a photo proving the destruction and throw it away herself. Not return the device. Not pretend to return the device and the device is thrown away behind her back. No no: this time, the distributor told her in no uncertain terms that it's cheaper for them to let her destroy the thing herself.

    And then it hit me: here is a device that was born in China, put together by some underpaid workers in a nondescript factory, designed by someone who didn't give a shit, made out of materials that probably came out of the ground somewhere in Africa and in Saudi Arabia - probably involving child labor at some point or other - put on a boat, shipped halfway around the world, then put into a truck, only to be landfilled here.

    It didn't even see a single second of use. This is utterly absurd and completely depressing.

    I'm not compatible with that. When I buy something, the thing has value and I want it to have a decently useful life. It's not about ecology or money: it's just basic respect for the resources and the human labor that went into this thing. The value of the object is what it cost the Earth and the people who toiled to make it and ship it to me. When I use my things, I show respect for those who made them and it justifies the use ot the materials they're made of.

    But here I was looking at that poor thing across the room, unloved and unlovable, whose sole purpose as an object was to be landfilled without ever seeing any use. It consumed resources and someone worked to make it, yet somehow it never had any value for anybody.

    And the most depressing thing about it is, its very existence from Chinese factory to my local landfill is totally absurd and makes no sense at all, yet all the invididual steps that contributed to it being fabricated and ultimately landing on our doorstep were a series of perfectly rational economical decisions: someone found added value in designing and building a shit foot massage machine, my wife found it worth buying sight unseen, someone figured there was money to be made shipping it here, and the distributor decided to outsource its destruction to the customers because it's cheaper than destroying it themselves - let alone shipping it back to Shenzen or wherever. And yet when you string everything together, the net result is senseless waste and production of things that have no inherent worth. How crazy is that eh?

    I couldn't throw it away. So I replaced the cord and I gave it to the local Red Cross store yesterday to give to someone in need or sell it for pennies. Today, I passed by the shop on my way to work and saw the damn thing in their garbage container behind the store. In the box. Unopened. I guess it will be going to the landfill after all...

    That really put the final damper on my day today...

    Sorry if this is the wrong venue, but I really needed to vent.

    41
    Is it just me or Rob Braxman has lost it lately?

    I've never been super-impressed by Rob Braxman. I mean he's never truly wrong in what he was saying in his Youtube videos, but his explanations are over-simplistic, a bit of a shortcut (but fair enough to reach a wide audience I guess), and mostly designed to sell his meh deGoogled cellphones and equally meh privacy services. But all in all, he's somewhat watchable and sometimes informative after I'm done watching all the new videos from the other, more interesting channels I follow.

    But lately, his videos seem to have shifted markedly toward unhinged rants and sensationalist conspiracy theory. His latest video for instance is utter nonsense:

    Skynet 2024: The Infrastructure is Complete!

    I mean yeah, okay, technically he's talking about a real thing. But Skynet? And doomsday Terminator imagery from 1984? Really?

    I'm pretty sure the man doesn't have all his fries in the cone anymore. This can't possibly be a conscious strategy to win more Youtube subscribers: this sort of video is going to lose him the part of his audience that has a genuine and technically-informed interest in privacy, and I doubt he's ever going to become a favorite of the sort of crowd who likes conspiracy theories.

    Either that or Youtube is a lot stupider than I thought and he noticed an uptick in subscribers when he makes videos like that. At any rate, I really hesitate to click on any of his new videos now.

    5
    Looks like Google is making life more difficult for deGooglers

    I haven't been able to update my cellphone anonymously with Aurora since January. Every time I try, Aurora errors out with "Oops, you are rate limited".

    This isn't the first time Google plays at making non-normies' lives difficult. So I tried the usual tricks, updated Aurora, tried the nightly build, waited, tried again... for months - to no avail: Google just won't play ball this time.

    Last week, Signal stopped working and demanded to be updated. Fortunately, Signal offers the APK as a normal download without having to get it from the hateful Google Play store.

    Today, my home banking identificator app did the same thing and stopped working. I needed to make a payment right now, and I had no way to update the app: "Oops, you are rate limited". And my bank sure doesn't offer the APK outside of anything but the goddamn Google Play store.

    So I relented and created a Google account. Which of course entailed giving Google a phone number. I sure didn't give them mine, so I phoned a friend abroad who doesn't care to ask him to receive the verification SMS on his phone and read out the code to me. Which worked long enough to set up 2FA and do away with phone numbers altogether. And finally, after an hour of fucking around, annoying other people and compromising their phone number, I could update my banking app and make my payment at last.

    All that because Google has decided they want to control my phone.

    Fuck Google.

    Seriously, how they are allowed to hold the Android world hostage like this without getting their monopolistic ass Sherman'ed AT&T-style, I'll never know. It's long overdue.

    68
    Sciatica-induced phantom pain

    Oh my!

    I thought I had been spared phantom pain, but it looks like my luck has run out.

    I've been having lower back pain for the past 3 months. nothing terrible, but constant and annoying enough that I finally booked a doctor's appointment for next week.

    And today things took a turn for the worse: I was doing the groceries when electricity started shooting down my right leg all of the sudden. Clearly sciatica has just kicked in. And my missing limbs came back to life with a vengeance too. First time in 5 1/5 years!

    Now I'm lying in bed. The pain in my leg had subsided, but the phantom pain hasn't 😢

    It's quite unbearable. If anybody has good advice, I'm all ears.

    My mom had sciatica for 9 months before she finally got back surgery 30 years ago. I remember she went through 9 months of hell - and she had all her limbs. If I'm looking at the same ordeal with phantom pains tacked on, I don't know if I'll be able to go through it... This truly scares me.

    0
    Any MNT Reform laptop owner out there for a few questions?

    cross-posted from: https://lemmy.sdf.org/post/13880246

    > I have a terrible el-cheapo 14" HP laptop that I bought from a big-box store a few years ago as an emergency replacement for a laptop that died on me on the road while visiting a customer. I literally went to the store 5 minutes before it closed, bought any laptop they had, loaded Linux on it at the hotel and transferred my files from the dead laptop overnight, then did my presentation the next morning. > > The trouble is, that laptop is VERY Linux unfriendly. I've put up with it for years because I don't like to throw things away, but I just can't stand the regular AMDGPU driver crashes and the broke-ass wifi-cum-bluetooth Realtek chipset anymore. > > So I'm on the market for a good Linux laptop. I'm not a demanding user - I use that HP laptop to edit videos and do CAD and I'm okay with it - I'm very comfortable with anything Linux and I can code my way around problems. > > I'm really tempted to get a MNT Reform laptop: I like the LiFePo4 battery cells a lot, it's solid, it's open hardware, it has a trackball and I love trackballs, it's highly hackable, and I'd like to support the MNT Research guys. And I'm old enough and the kids have been out of the house long enough that money is no object. > > But a couple of things are holding me back. Maybe there are MNT Reform owners here who could shed some light on the following questions: > > > - I don't know much of the ARM ecosystem, and what to expect from what processor / SoC. So I'm thinking of going with the highest end RK3588 32GB / 256GB CPU module offered by MNT. Would this at least match the performances of my stupid HP laptop's Ryzen 5 CPU in terms of real-world performances? > > Or put another way: should I expect to take a hit when encoding my videos or doing big CAD models compared to this already slow laptop, or can I reasonably expect the MNT Reform to at least not be a regression. > > Side question (yes, I know it should be obvious, but asking is better than guessing): I assume the "32GB / 256GB" in the CPU module's denomination is for 32GB of RAM and 256GB of onboard flash. Meaning I'd have that much disk space without needing to add a NVMe SSD card. Correct? > > > - The keyboard layout looks all shades of terrible. I'm flexible with anything but not keyboard layouts - and especially those keyboard that don't put the left SHIFT and CTRL at the bottom where they belong, or have a split space bar. > > The Reform's keyboard ticks all the wrong boxes for me in that respect: I can tell rightaway that it's going to fight my typing muscle memory all the time and forever, because I sure ain't gonna get used to it. > > Can I remap the keys so I can at least I can swap CTRL and whatever that key is at the bottom left, and make the 3 buttons that replace the space bar act as a space bar? Then it's just a matter of putting a sticker on the keys and gluing the space bar keycaps together somehow. > > > - I seem to recall some years ago that if the laptop was left off and unplugged for long enough - like 2 weeks IIRC - it would drain the cells and kill them because there was no under-voltage protection. Less dramatically but equally annoyingly, you couldn't leave it unplugged for a few days and expect to find it fully charged when you needed it most. > > Does it still do that? Or has the hardware been fixed - or maybe there's a "Turn really off" option in the little side computer that runs the mini OLED display? > > Mind you, I can always drill a hole and add a physical switch to disconnect the cells, but I'd rather not do that. > > > - Is there an option to limit the charge? Keeping Li-ion cells constantly at 100% (or worse, charging all the time) when the laptop is plugged in isn't ideal. I'd rather it kept the cells charged around 80% . And I mostly use my laptops plugged in. > > > - Can I remove the cells and use the laptop plugged in? I might eschew the cells altogether, because I really never need them: I'm plugged in at home, I'm plugged in on the train, I'm plugged in at the hotel, I'm plugged in at the customer's. I can't remember a time when I needed to run this particular laptop on battery. If I can use the laptop as a luggable computer, I wouldn't need to carry the weight of the cells around. > > > - Has anybody tried to install Cinnamon? Does it work well on Debian ARM? I see no reason why it shouldn't, but maybe there are issues. > > > Well that's pretty much it. Sorry for the long post 🙂 There's precious little information about the MNT Reform out there - probably a good indication that there are precious few such machines in the wild, sadly - so I would welcome any real-world user feedback!

    11
    Any MNT Reform laptop owner out there for a few questions?

    I have a terrible el-cheapo 14" HP laptop that I bought from a big-box store a few years ago as an emergency replacement for a laptop that died on me on the road while visiting a customer. I literally went to the store 5 minutes before it closed, bought any laptop they had, loaded Linux on it at the hotel and transferred my files from the dead laptop overnight, then did my presentation the next morning.

    The trouble is, that laptop is VERY Linux unfriendly. I've put up with it for years because I don't like to throw things away, but I just can't stand the regular AMDGPU driver crashes and the broke-ass wifi-cum-bluetooth Realtek chipset anymore.

    So I'm on the market for a good Linux laptop. I'm not a demanding user - I use that HP laptop to edit videos and do CAD and I'm okay with it - I'm very comfortable with anything Linux and I can code my way around problems.

    I'm really tempted to get a MNT Reform laptop: I like the LiFePo4 battery cells a lot, it's solid, it's open hardware, it has a trackball and I love trackballs, it's highly hackable, and I'd like to support the MNT Research guys. And I'm old enough and the kids have been out of the house long enough that money is no object.

    But a couple of things are holding me back. Maybe there are MNT Reform owners here who could shed some light on the following questions:

    • I don't know much of the ARM ecosystem, and what to expect from what processor / SoC. So I'm thinking of going with the highest end RK3588 32GB / 256GB CPU module offered by MNT. Would this at least match the performances of my stupid HP laptop's Ryzen 5 CPU in terms of real-world performances?

      Or put another way: should I expect to take a hit when encoding my videos or doing big CAD models compared to this already slow laptop, or can I reasonably expect the MNT Reform to at least not be a regression.

      Side question (yes, I know it should be obvious, but asking is better than guessing): I assume the "32GB / 256GB" in the CPU module's denomination is for 32GB of RAM and 256GB of onboard flash. Meaning I'd have that much disk space without needing to add a NVMe SSD card. Correct?

    • The keyboard layout looks all shades of terrible. I'm flexible with anything but not keyboard layouts - and especially those keyboard that don't put the left SHIFT and CTRL at the bottom where they belong, or have a split space bar.

      The Reform's keyboard ticks all the wrong boxes for me in that respect: I can tell rightaway that it's going to fight my typing muscle memory all the time and forever, because I sure ain't gonna get used to it.

      Can I remap the keys so I can at least I can swap CTRL and whatever that key is at the bottom left, and make the 3 buttons that replace the space bar act as a space bar? Then it's just a matter of putting a sticker on the keys and gluing the space bar keycaps together somehow.

    • I seem to recall some years ago that if the laptop was left off and unplugged for long enough - like 2 weeks IIRC - it would drain the cells and kill them because there was no under-voltage protection. Less dramatically but equally annoyingly, you couldn't leave it unplugged for a few days and expect to find it fully charged when you needed it most.

      Does it still do that? Or has the hardware been fixed - or maybe there's a "Turn really off" option in the little side computer that runs the mini OLED display?

      Mind you, I can always drill a hole and add a physical switch to disconnect the cells, but I'd rather not do that.

    • Is there an option to limit the charge? Keeping Li-ion cells constantly at 100% (or worse, charging all the time) when the laptop is plugged in isn't ideal. I'd rather it kept the cells charged around 80% . And I mostly use my laptops plugged in.

    • Can I remove the cells and use the laptop plugged in? I might eschew the cells altogether, because I really never need them: I'm plugged in at home, I'm plugged in on the train, I'm plugged in at the hotel, I'm plugged in at the customer's. I can't remember a time when I needed to run this particular laptop on battery. If I can use the laptop as a luggable computer, I wouldn't need to carry the weight of the cells around.

    • Has anybody tried to install Cinnamon? Does it work well on Debian ARM? I see no reason why it shouldn't, but maybe there are issues.

    Well that's pretty much it. Sorry for the long post 🙂 There's precious little information about the MNT Reform out there - probably a good indication that there are precious few such machines in the wild, sadly - so I would welcome any real-world user feedback!

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    Tethered plastic caps

    I know they're supposed to be good for the environment. But... Holy smokes they drive me up the wall. They really do!

    I had no trouble adapting when aluminum can pull-tabs got replaced by push-tabs, because it was pretty much the same movement, and I could see the immediate advantage of not getting cut by a pull-tab.

    But the tethered cap is fighting decades of muscle memory in me: I'm used to taking the cap off with one hand and keeping it there while taking a swig with the other. Now I unscrew the cap with one hand, but I still have to hold the cap so it's out of the way. It feels like drinking in handcuffs each and every time...

    So unlike the pull-tab, the tethered plastic bottle cap is one of those compulsory eco solutions that constantly make you feel ever-so-slightly more miserable all the time, and I hate that because ecology only works when it brings something of value both to people and to the environment.

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    ExtremeDullard ExtremeDullard @lemmy.sdf.org
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