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The West finally allowed Ukraine to strike back at Russia — and it seems to be working
  • Look, Putin has been very clear that he wants peace. All Ukraine have to do is surrender and pull out of the quarter of their country that Russia has "Annexed" while not in control of. Then peace negotiations can begin as to what else Ukraine has to give up in order for the fighting to not resume.

    (Note, not sarcasm, this actually the offer Russia has given for a ceasefire, not even peace terms)

  • Google and Microsoft consume more power than some countries
  • To put a bit of context on those, 50GWh is a single medium sized power station running for 2 days. To create something that is being used around 10 million times a day all over the world.

    At 10 million queries per day that puts the usage per query at 100-500 Wh, about the amount of energy used by leaving an old incandecent lightbulb on for an hour, or playing a demanding video game for about 20 minutes.

    As another comparison, In the USA alone around 12,000 GWh of energy is spent in burning gasoline in vehicles every single day. So Americans driving 1% less for a single day would save more energy than creating GPT4 and the world using it for a year.

  • Free-threaded CPython is ready to experiment with!
  • I was responding to your general statement that python is slow and so there is no point in making it faster, I agree that removing the GIL wont do much to improve the execution speed for programs making heavy use of numpy or things calling outside it.

    That’s a bit suss too tbh. Did the C++ version use an existing library like Eigen too or did they implement everything from scratch?

    It was written entirely from scratch which is kind of my point, a well writen python program can outperform a naive c implementation and is vastly simpler to create.

    If you have the expertise and are willing to put in the effort you likely can squeze that extra bit of performance out by dropping to a lower level language, but for certain workloads you can get good performance out of python if you know what you are doing so calling it extremely slow and saying you have to move to another language if you care about performance is missleading.

  • Free-threaded CPython is ready to experiment with!
  • Numpy is written in C.

    Python is written in C too, what's your point? I've seen this argument a few times and I find it bizarre that "easily able to incorporate highly optimised Fortran and C numerical routines" is somehow portrayed as a point against python.

    Numpy is a defacto extension to the python standard that adds first class support for single type multi-dimensional arrays and functions for working on them. It is implemented in a mixture of python and c (about 60% python according to github) , interfaces with python's c-api and links in specialist libraries for operations. You could write the same statement for parts of the python std-lib, is that also not python?

    Its hard to not understate just how much simpler development is in numpy compared to c++, in this example here the new python version was less than 50 lines and was developed in an afternoon, the c++ version was closing in on 1000 lines over 6 files.

  • Free-threaded CPython is ready to experiment with!
  • Nope, if you're working on large arrays of data you can get significant speed ups using well optimised BLAS functions that are vectorised (numpy) which beats out simply written c++ operating on each array element in turn. There's also Numba which uses LLVM to jit compile a subset of python to get compiled performance, though I didnt go to that in this case.

    You could link the BLAS libraries to c++ but its significantly more work than just importing numpy from python.

  • Free-threaded CPython is ready to experiment with!
  • Python can be extremely slow, it doesn't have to be. I recently re-wrote a stats program at work and got a ~500x speedup over the original python and a 10x speed up over the c++ rewrite of that. If you know how python works and avoid the performance foot-guns like nested loops you can often (though not always) get good performance.

  • Why haven't we figured out monetisation for peertube?
  • Biggest reason Linux fails where Windows 11 sucseeds is because the vast VAST majority cannot figure out linux’s user experience.

    Nope, the bigest reason why windows is more popular than linux is the same as youtube is more popular than peertube - its the default and most people dont look past that. Honestly default Gnome UX is better than win11 these days unless you already have thousands of hours of windows muscle memory, which a very large chunk of people do.

  • The left-wing French coalition hoping to introduce 90% tax on rich
  • Funadmentally it makes sense that tax take is 0 at 0% and low (though not neccessarily 0) at 100%, but in practice it only ever used to advocate for lowering taxes no matter what they are set at currently. You never see people talking about governments being on the left side of the Laffer curve and therfore we should raise taxes.

    There's also no evidence that I'm aware of that the curve is smooth, single peaked or even single valued and it is also likely highly dependent on myriad other factors, in short it's effectively useless except as a rhetorical device for small-staters to advocate slashing taxes and public services.

  • Most consumers hate the idea of AI-generated customer service
  • Because they are not trying to design an efficient system. They are trying to design a system that is as cheep as possible, puts off as many customers as possible from interacting with it while not being so bad as to fall foul of regulations. A well designed website that efficiently took you to the right place to make your complaint and get money from them/make them do something would fail requirement 2.

  • Almost half Tory members want merger with Reform UK, poll suggests, as leadership infighting escalates – UK politics live
  • No, the MPs didnt put anyone else forwards to the membership. So instead of going something like 8-5-3-2 candidates by mp vote then those two going to the members it just started at 1 with no other candidate gettign enough support, so there was no need for a membership vote.

    The Tory party is generally significantly less democratic than the other major parties, as is fitting for the politcial wing of wealth.

  • Almost half Tory members want merger with Reform UK, poll suggests, as leadership infighting escalates – UK politics live
  • FWIW point 5 doesnt work. The current tory leadership selection method is that the MPs keep narrowing down the selection untill they get to 2 candidates then the members choose between those two. So if the MPs dont want her the members wont get a chance to vote for her.

  • French election 2024 live: exit poll shows shock win for left-green alliance as far right falls to third
  • Yes? As I said they have a wide range of views giving comment. Just because it isnt Pravda doesnt mean its exclusively neoliberal. For example you'll be hard pressed to find any opinion pieces favourable to privatisation and public sector cuts which are two of the chief pillars of neo-liberal orthodoxy.

  • Jeremy Corbyn re-elected as independent in Islington North after expulsion from Labour
  • the first one

    “Pouring arms in isn’t going to bring about a solution, it’s only going to prolong and exaggerate this war,” Corbyn said. “We might be in for years and years of a war in Ukraine.”

    Corbyn gave the interview on Al Mayadeen, a Beirut-based TV channel that has carried pro-Russia reporting since Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.

    “What I find disappointing is that hardly any of the world’s leaders use the word peace; they always use the language of more war, and more bellicose war.”

    He added: “This war is disastrous for the people of Ukraine, for the people of Russia, and for the safety and security of the whole world, and therefore there has to be much more effort put into peace.”

    He is critical of supplying arms and not looking for a peaceful solution, but that is not calling for a withdrawal of Aid despite the Guardian's framing.

    The second is from 2014 in which he says:

    Russia has gone way beyond its legal powers to use bases in the Crimea. Sending unidentified forces into another country is clearly a violation of that country’s sovereignty.

    Still, the hypocrisy of the West remains unbelievable. NATO has sought to expand since the end of the cold war. It has increased its military capability and expenditure. It operates way beyond its original 1948 area and its attempt to encircle Russia is one of the big threats of our time.

    We have marched against wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. We should oppose any foreign military intervention in Ukraine, as that would only succeed in that country reliving its traumatic past as a battleground where Russia and Western Europe vie for supremacy.

    Nowhere in that second article does he say Ukraine should cede Crimea, he just gives a factual account of if being transferred from the Russian to the Ukrainian SSR. I'm really not seeing any simping for Putin here.

    To be clear, I dont agree with Corbyn's stance personally, I believe Russia is an expansionist imperialist power than needs to be stopped by force now that it has overstepped the line and launched a military invasion of a neighbor. But having a different view (as he does does that more effort should be put onto brokering a peace deal) not equate to being a patsy for a dictator.

  • X weighs adding a downvote button to replies — but it doesn't want to emulate Reddit
  • Please don't put words in my mouth. I haven't once said that only downvotes can solve it, just that they do offer a level of filtering. The things that you suggested (block people, sites and communities) do not address that unless you get to an extreme level of isolating a community to the point where it is effectively closed.

  • People are worried that AI will take everyone’s jobs. We’ve been here before.
    www.technologyreview.com People are worried that AI will take everyone’s jobs. We’ve been here before.

    In a 1938 article, MIT’s president argued that technical progress didn’t mean fewer jobs. He’s still right.

    People are worried that AI will take everyone’s jobs. We’ve been here before.

    In a 1938 article, MIT’s president argued that technical progress didn’t mean fewer jobs. He’s still right.

    Compton drew a sharp distinction between the consequences of technological progress on “industry as a whole” and the effects, often painful, on individuals.

    For “industry as a whole,” he concluded, “technological unemployment is a myth.” That’s because, he argued, technology "has created so many new industries” and has expanded the market for many items by “lowering the cost of production to make a price within reach of large masses of purchasers.” In short, technological advances had created more jobs overall. The argument—and the question of whether it is still true—remains pertinent in the age of AI.

    Then Compton abruptly switched perspectives, acknowledging that for some workers and communities, “technological unemployment may be a very serious social problem, as in a town whose mill has had to shut down, or in a craft which has been superseded by a new art.”

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    Nose wheel falls off Boeing 757 airliner waiting for takeoff
    www.theguardian.com Nose wheel falls off Boeing 757 airliner waiting for takeoff

    Delta Air Lines jet was due to depart Atlanta international airport and none of the crew or passengers were hurt

    Nose wheel falls off Boeing 757 airliner waiting for takeoff

    Because Boeing were on such a good streak already...

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    The Sam Altman Soap Opera Reflects Silicon Valley at Its Worst
    www.vanityfair.com The Sam Altman Soap Opera Reflects Silicon Valley at Its Worst

    Silicon Valley’s court of public opinion found the ousted OpenAI chief innocent until proven innocent, exposing the cult of personality that surrounds the tech world’s star CEOs.

    The Sam Altman Soap Opera Reflects Silicon Valley at Its Worst
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    Everyone Is a Luddite Now
    www.wired.com Everyone Is a Luddite Now

    A new history of the Luddites, "Blood in the Machine," argues that 19th century fears about technology are still relevant today. It's the latest in a long line of attempts to reclaim the label.

    Everyone Is a Luddite Now
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    Hong Kong: Cantonese language group shuts down after targeting by national security police
    www.theguardian.com Hong Kong: Cantonese language group shuts down after targeting by national security police

    Fears that China’s crackdown on dissidents is expanding into cultural sphere after linguistic group closes over a fictional essay about erosion of liberties

    Hong Kong: Cantonese language group shuts down after targeting by national security police
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    InitialsDiceBearhttps://github.com/dicebear/dicebearhttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/„Initials” (https://github.com/dicebear/dicebear) by „DiceBear”, licensed under „CC0 1.0” (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/)WO
    Womble @lemmy.world
    Posts 11
    Comments 455